strategy: zoomorphism +

Illustrators, among others, try to avoid it by using several "tools". Here's "explanation". Metaphor/Simile: You're as docile (or woolly?) as a lamb. Which one is it? Metaphor = Equate. Simile = Like or as.

Juxtapose: I hate this word, but, you know. Next to. As in I draw you next to, or place you atop of a lamb.

Visual pun: In the shape of a lamb?

Repetition: As in, many lambs accompany you.

Skew: It's odd (somehow) so you see that you're related (or differently) to a lamb.

Allusion: I lift (steal) from an image, story or idea that is known. I didn't do this to my knowledge (but have before).

Isolate: I separate colors, or shapes or textures (or other elements) so you know what I mean.

Scale change: One thing is smaller or bigger than the other. As in, I make your lamb ears so large, or your skin so hairy, you can't avoid noticing.

Compare/contrast: Things are the same, or different. As in, you're soft or woolly or, conversely, not looking like a lamb.

Paradox: A man is not a lamb, is he?

Personify: I give attributes of a human, or represent as a human, not an animal. And in that vein...

Anthropomorphism: Duh, but can extend to inanimate objects or phenomena.

Metamorphosis: As in, I turn you into a lamb.

***** But you are ONE. And are loved (extraordinarily). You, Mr. Albert Lamb.

ss_lamb_kdsart_art.jpg

strategy: personification + anthropomorphism

An object, place, the weather - anything that is not a person - takes on the attributes of a human being.  To personify:  give abstract ideas like the weather and seasons human attributes.  To anthropomorph:  give human attributes to non-human entities.

In the illustration below, the tree takes on the behavior of a beau and nuzzles the lady surrounded by a grove of other, less realized tea olives.

sandoz_teaolive.jpg

"love in the time of tea olives,"  originally published for salted & styled, 2013.

what is a thumbnail sketch?

The difference between a thumbnail and a sketch is that the thumbnail is bound by the orientation and proportions outlined by the project or art director.  

It is a small, thumbnail size-ish drawing that tells two things:  the basic composition and the basic concept of the image.  A good art director will tell you, “I want three compositions for this concept,” or “I want three concepts for this scenario.” That should prompt you to draw one concept three ways, or draw three concepts one way.

kds_concept_thumbnail.jpg

This here's a thumbnail for a potential image for the 2017 book of short stories titled "The Man Who Shot Out My Eye Is Dead." by Chanelle Benz.  I like one-eye stories and folks whose names end in "Z", so even though I haven't read the book, I can speculate.(Eye joke!)

Specs:  The image is squarish - or so the thumbnail indicates.  Someone is standing in front of a shooting range.  They appear to have a shot out, or, at least, a very dark eye.  He or she is holding an urn.  Draw conclusions. 

Facts:  The flower on the urn is a stinking corpse flower!  It grows the largest individual bloom in the world, larger than 3 children, and smells like a rotting body!  The shape of the shot-out eye person is similar to the target silhouettes.  The shot out eye and the stinking corpse flowers shapes are also similar. Alice Walker, who I used as my hair model for this piece,  is a one-eyed wonder.  This comparing and contrasting of shapes and relationships is also a strategy for making strong or stronger concepts (see concept vs. idea) and visual communication.  

Fun things:  Give the AD something to worry about so they don’t harp about your drawing skills or lackadaisical visual strategizing:  Why does he/she wear a Frenchy-like striped shirt?  What does that have to do with anything?  What is the subject a he or a she?  Are all shooting ranges found in the desert? 

"OCTOBER" at Location Gallery with Laney Contemporary

I am pleased to present a new series of works titled "OCTOBER" that exhibits at Location Gallery in tandem with Laney Contemporary at 417 Whitaker Street at Austin Hill Realty in Savannah, Georgia through October 27th.

Conceived the week that Hurricane Matthew struck Savannah with gallery director Peter Roberts, and developed over the last year, the latest series, “October", includes paintings, textiles and a wall installation.

New works feature the landscapes and botanicals that thrive regionally in October. Within the layers of paint, I've folded concepts from traditions and religions that have been historically practiced at the time of the harvest moon and in the month of October.

Come celebrate the veil of nature’s small and large forces and explore its color, mystery and power.

 (october) big leaf magnolia, 40" x 40", water-based media on canvas, 2016-2017. 

(october) big leaf magnolia, 40" x 40", water-based media on canvas, 2016-2017. 

Gallery profits from sales are donated to A-Town Get Down Festival which supports music and arts creative programming nationally throughout the year.

Complimentary seasonal beverages were artfully crafted on opening night by The 1970.

 

 

laney contemporary grand opening

I am pleased to be one of the artists whose work is included among those featured on Thursday, September 28th at the GRAND opening of Laney Contemporary.

6:30 to 9:30 p.m.

1810 Mills B Lane Blvd
Savannah, Georgia 31405

 (october) moonflowers, 40" x 40",  water-based media on canvas, 2017 available now at Laney Contemporary.

(october) moonflowers, 40" x 40",  water-based media on canvas, 2017 available now at Laney Contemporary.


The grand opening features works by acclaimed contemporary artists Katherine Sandoz, Betsy Cain, Marcus Kenney, Todd Schroeder, Pamela Wiley, Stephanie Howard, and Will Penny, in addition to showcasing select photographs by Jack Leigh. 

Many of the featured artists will attend the opening, and Penny will create a site-specific, video projection mapping installation in the green space in front of the gallery that will begin at 7:30. Refreshments will be served, and Big Bon Pizza’s mobile wood fired pizza will be available for purchase from 6:30 to 9 p.m. (or sold out).

*Parking is available, but limited.
Please consider carpooling or taking Uber or Lyft.

art scams: please don't send a check

these "surprise gift of art to wife + moving to the philippines" art scams are so lame. you'd think the architects could be more convincing. also, they could be less repetitive and use punctuation properly! are they bots? their editorial statements are hilarious > #worthit #goodstuff #nodontsendacheck

(as delivered, after i provided a link for purchase)

So I'm trying to gather some good
stuff to make this event a surprise one. I am buying the art work of
$2,800 as a gifts to her.I'm okay with the price, I think it's worth
it
anyway, so I'll be sending a check.
 (bermuda studies) banyans, 10" x 10", water-based media on panel, 2016-2017   

(bermuda studies) banyans, 10" x 10", water-based media on panel, 2016-2017

 

eudora welty

Photographer, writer, southern literata Eudora Welty drawn on the 15th anniversary of her death. Eudora might mean "good gift" from the Greek eu and doron.  Eudora is also the name of one of the five (!) minor goddesses.

demystifying the artist statement

Dear Lester Monzon and Lester's Gallery Who Should Know Better if Lester Doesn't,

Biography suggests that one speak about one's life. That's how it works. In the field of art. We use statement, biography, resume or CV.  The differences are distinct and important. I have offered a more understandable and accessible version of your "about" statement even if you have titled it "biography".  And while I translate this statement-biography to poke fun at artist statements in general, I wonder if Monzon or his gallery actually means to say what he/it has said?  In other words, is the statement, like the paintings, also a kind of joke, and if so, why?

Sincerely, kds

 Lester Monzon,  Googley, 2010 / acrylic and graphite on linen / 9 x 12 inches, courtesy Lester Monzon + Mark Moore Gallery

Lester Monzon, Googley, 2010 / acrylic and graphite on linen / 9 x 12 inches, courtesy Lester Monzon + Mark Moore Gallery

(original "biography")

By collapsing of architecture, space, and art history, Lester Monzon's work dissects the notion of context. Colorful gesticulations conceal sections of rigid patterning, a tete-a-tete between abstract expressionism and hard-edge abstraction that implies a gentle lampooning of the taxonomic tradition. Monzon upends the formalism and segregation innate to the fine art world, and fabricates a composite genealogy of painting - a pithy resolution to an otherwise vapid debate. Monzon's luscious brushstrokes slyly creep into a Hirst-esque field of dots or Noland-like plane of stripes, like the resurrection of a once-declared dead practice through a satirical hand. In his recent work, Monzon applies this critique of contextual art to mark-making in public spaces; be it graffiti on tiles in a public bathroom, stains on the sidewalk, or the popularized notion of "street art.

  Damien Hirst. “Zirconyl Chloride,” 2008. Household gloss on canvas. 84 inches diameter. Courtesy Gagosian Gallery. © Damien Hirst/ Science Ltd, 2012. Photography Prudence Cuming Associates.

Damien Hirst. “Zirconyl Chloride,” 2008. Household gloss on canvas. 84 inches diameter. Courtesy Gagosian Gallery. © Damien Hirst/ Science Ltd, 2012. Photography Prudence Cuming Associates.

(translated "statement")

Lester Monzon makes pictures that refer to architecture, how architecture sits in space and art history.  Sometimes he paints in a messy way and sometimes he paints very precisely.  In Monzon’s world, both of these actions refer to traditions of abstract expression and hard-edge abstraction. With this, Monzon offers an artist’s inside joke:  my paintings, in capsule, offer a system of classification for art history.  He doesn’t want you to worry about what issues* arise in the art world because you can accept his quick and concise summation of art history in place of others’ uninteresting and bland solutions**. 

(Skipping ahead to technique without transition) Monzon uses a lot of paint.  If this paint were a person, he is a sly personality that can impersonate dots or stripes (that Monzon associates with the artist Hirst (dots) and the artist Noland (stripes)).  By impersonating dots and stripes, Monzon (or this sly person who is paint) miraculously brings dots and stripes back to life because they had been dead*.  You should realize that this is satire.

These days, Monzon is taking his version of funny to the streets - literally.  He is painting on dirty sidewalks, on the tile in public restrooms or in some place that is called “street art” that has been made popular.  

** Monzon graciously removes the viewer from a “vapid” solution to a “pithy” one

In summary, I think Mr. Monzon might engage someone to write more precisely about how and why his painting and his work merits discussion and appreciation.  This statement does no service to him, his work or to the viewer.  The work can be satirical and difficult to understand.  The statement should not.  It should additionally be an explanation and give, if not a roadmap, at least a cardinal direction toward better knowing the work and the artist.

  Kenneth Noland, Via Light 1968, acrylic on canvas, 54 x 113 inches, Courtesy of Lelie Feely Fine Art

Kenneth Noland, Via Light 1968, acrylic on canvas, 54 x 113 inches, Courtesy of Lelie Feely Fine Art

thistle symbolism

The layered symbolism that has developed surrounding the thistle flower begins with its spine-like stems and spiky blossom connected with the crown chakra or third eye. The color purple (named from this predatory mollusk!)has long been associated with royalty, good judgment and spiritual enlightenment. You can read more about additional connections that have been drawn throughout time and by varying cultures here.

Or you might recall or rediscover your own experience of the thistle through this painting.  

 (flora) thistle, 24" x 24", water-based media on panel, 2015-2016 available via  spalding nix fine art

(flora) thistle, 24" x 24", water-based media on panel, 2015-2016 available via spalding nix fine art

katherine sandoz art featured at "the english room"

What a thrill to be interviewed and featured in the "Artist Spotlight" over at The English Room. I have known designer + curator Holly Hollingsworth Phillips for about five years as we are perennial participants at The Southern Coterie Summit. In that time, I have enjoyed (+ studied) Holly's interior design + lifestyle  blog, her strong and sophisticated color play, and - no surprise - her great skill in finding the best kaftans to be had across the globe.  

Please enjoy the feature, all the great artists spotlights that have already been offered and all that Holly graciously shares via The English Room.

 (flora) bromeliad, 48" x 48", water-based media on panel, 2015-2016 , available through  spalding nix fine art

(flora) bromeliad, 48" x 48", water-based media on panel, 2015-2016 , available through spalding nix fine art